Wednesday, April 23, 2008

Cheat Sheet


*Click on font to read cheat sheet material*

This is the front page of my "Cheat sheet" for a University Finance class. The flip side of the page was equally busy, with numerous examples. You have to take advantage of every opportunity you are provided.

That being said, I never understood and agreed with the logic of cheat sheet in exams - especially when you put examples that are nearly identical to the questions being asked on exams.

Of course you still have to know your material - and all members of the class are given the same opportunity to write in extremely small font - but it's also an item that provides the less prepared a marginal advantage over those who are more prepared.

And whatever happened to the conventional formula sheet? All Finance classes and nowadays, even some accounting classes, allow one the opportunity of double sided cheat sheets - is this a new trend?

Any 'old-timers' want to shed some light?

In other news, I came across this great site

http://www.sportscliche.com/

15 comments:

PDO said...

I didn't get to use a cheat sheet in either my accounting, or finance exams, and I really don't want to see the result of that finance exam.

Bitch prof.

PDO said...

Oh, and I think every single test should be open book.

Seriously.

In the real world, you're given a time frame to do something, and any resources that you need to finish said task.

So why not make the exam world the same? Doesn't it only make sense? I mean, if I was an employer, I'd rather give someone an hour to do something and know it'll get done right, then give them an hour to do it, and know they'll get it done in an hour, but there'll be guesses, and instead of double checking/finding the answers in the appropriate places, they'll just make sure their guesses are accurate in their own mind.

PunjabiOil said...

I think marks reflect your effort and time put into your work - so on that basis, open book tests may not be the proper method.

Oilman said...

Man, Arabic is one tough language to read!:o)

PunjabiOil said...

Haha, yeah, it wasn't exactly legible writing, but then again, there aren't any bonus points for smooth writing.

In hockey terms, the player that gets his nose dirty, driving hard to the net, will obtain that success.

PS - get your hockey pool picks in by tommorow. Thanks

DeBakey said...

My advice is to keep the action on your slide rule free.
A little soap works.
If that things jams,
well , i don't hold out much hope for your chances.

The Kandyman said...

Nice cheat sheet. Now, im interested in finding out if all that hard work REALLY does pay. Make sure to post all your grades up too!

Backhand said...

Enjoyed the cliche site. I'll have to rehearse some for my softball season :).

PunjabiOil said...

Nice cheat sheet. Now, im interested in finding out if all that hard work REALLY does pay. Make sure to post all your grades up too!
Oh, don't be a poor sport.

And answer your damn phone calls/texts

PunjabiOil said...

Enjoyed the cliche site. I'll have to rehearse some for my softball season :).

Glad you did.

MikeP said...

A co-worker taught a particular Computer Science class for many moons, and allowed cheat sheets. He also cruised the exam room looking for the best examples.

He found that almost invariably, those who did the best had the best cheat sheets. Those with crappy sheets also had crappy marks.

And why wouldn't open book tests reflect effort you've put into your work?

For that matter, on what basis do you make your assertion that marks reflect time and effort put into your work?

I'd rather see marks disposed of altogether, since I think they're an artificial measure. Do you base your judgement of a hockey player exclusively on his or her points total? Why not?

PunjabiOil said...


For that matter, on what basis do you make your assertion that marks reflect time and effort put into your work?


Experience. In courses I put more effort and time in, I usually did better.

MikeP said...

You didn't know any students who seemed to glide through courses effortlessly?

Even accepting your assertion - that marks reflect time and effort - who cares how hard you worked? Can you do the work when it counts? Tests are artificial and marks are - as hinted previously - tantamount to judging players on points. Or +/-. Or pick some other artificial measure.

In case it's not clear, I'm leaning towards advocating eliminating marks altogether, although I know it's heresy. (It's not because I did poorly either, I have one honours degree and I'm working on another.)

PunjabiOil said...

You didn't know any students who seemed to glide through courses effortlessly?

Yeah I know a few. I also know they don't glide through courses consistently. Then again, we have to establish a standard on what consists of ''gliding through'' and ''effortlessly''

Even accepting your assertion - that marks reflect time and effort - who cares how hard you worked?
Employers

Can you do the work when it counts? Tests are artificial and marks are - as hinted previously - tantamount to judging players on points. Or +/-. Or pick some other artificial measure.


Well, an exam is a session which consists of a limited time period - which defines how clutch (think playoffS) you are. In hockey terms, it's the difference between a Shawn Horcoff who enrolls into top conditioning programs, versus a Joffrey Lupul who plays through a miserable season because he's not strong enough.

In case it's not clear, I'm leaning towards advocating eliminating marks altogether, although I know it's heresy.

Then there would be no incentive to perform to your peak and everyone would free-load.

MikeP said...

I'm an employer. I don't give a rip how hard you worked on your degree or what marks you got; I don't even care if you *have* a degree, although it helps. What I care about is what you can do for me. I don't think I'm that unusual.

If your incentive to perform to your peak during your degree isn't the quest for knowledge (trite, I know) then I would say you're in school for the wrong reasons. You shouldn't need something artificial like a mark to give you that incentive. Free-load? Only if you make the marks the goal of going to school. That's putting the cart before the horse.